Confederates arrive at south portion of battlefield for first advance on Fort Davidson in Pilot Knob MO.

On September 24, 1864, Confederate General Sterling Price and his troops arrived in the small railhead town of Pilot Knob Missouri on a trek to regain Missouri for the Confederacy and divert troops from the struggling Eastern Theater of battle. His infamous raid took him from southeast Missouri through the center of the state and then briefly into Kansas whereupon what was left of his army began retreating into Arkansas, sealing that fate of the country west of the Mississippi to the Union.

That was 150 years ago this year. As the sesquicentennial has arrived it is interesting to see what events are being planned across this infamous path that Price travelled. Some portions appear to have embraced their significance and will be planning events, while smaller locations, no less significant however, seem to be passing this anniversary by.

Last year on my Facebook group Civil War in Missouri,

Watercolor of the 12th Wisconsin Volunteers marching through Tecumseh, KS on their way to Fort Riley, April 1862. Created by John Gaddis of Company E.

It’s been a while since I put anything on this site, so I figured I would write about my research regarding the Civil War and my ancestors.

On the maternal side I have the most who served during the war. My 2nd great grandfather was 2nd Lieutenant George W. Brown, CO. K 12th Wisconsin Infantry. He enlisted 31 August 1861 as a corporal, was promoted to 1st Sergeant and on 11 February 1865 promoted to 2LT. He mustered out on 16 July 1865. The 12th Wisconsin Infantry was organized between October 18 and December 13, 1861, at Camp Randall in Madison. The regiment left Wisconsin for Fort Leavenworth,Kansas, on January 11, 1862, arriving on February 16. During its service, the regiment moved through Missouri, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, and Washington D.C. It participated in the sieges of Jackson, Atlanta and Savannah, and fought in

The SUVCW camp I belong to, Old Abe Camp #16, here in Topeka holds a monthly work day where we go to Topeka Cemetery and work to preserve the heritage and memory of our Union Civil War soldiers.

This past month one of our members stumbled across a plot that had a direct connection with our camp.

Osco Ashbaugh was the son of John M Ashbaugh, who was Bugler of CO. C 5th KS CAV and member of Lincoln Post 1. Brother Osco was born in Topeka in 1867 and was a member of the original Old Abe Camp #16 and passed away in 1935.

To be a brother in this camp and to be able to look down at a son of a Civil War veteran and was obviously proud of that fact enough to have it on his headstone is testament as to what the SUVCW stands for

London Elementary School 5th grade teacher, Eric Marshall

I recently saw a piece on CBS Sunday Morning about a teacher in North Carolina, Eric Marshall, who for the past 15 years has held a Civil War Camp at the school he teaches at. After watching this, I realized that THIS is what history is about.

I have been in contact with Mr Marshall and should note that this project is not a one-man show. He has a LOT of volunteers, support from his school, local history groups and those willing to help fund the project.

In my emails with him, he said something that I believe is spot on – “The Civil War needs to be examined more closely, in my opinion and we are all losing much to cover it lightly.” How right he is. The Civil War is a hard subject to cover and when done properly and historically, forces the student to look at the

I made a stop this weekend at a cemetery just north of my home in Topeka called Rochester Cemetery. It is one of the oldest in the city and holds the remains of many of the settlers and founders of Kansas. My real interest however is of course the Civil War and the soldiers who served and are buried there.

I stopped by the office and spoke with the caretaker there and we had a wonderful discussion about some of the history of the cemetery. However, they had a fire around 1901 and many of their records prior to that were lost. I mentioned that the SUVCW camp I belong to does work days at the Topeka Cemetery and various projects related to the G.A.R. section there and he told me that there is a section full of Civil War soldiers and a monument to them.

I drove up to

Reenactors fire their guns during the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Moore's Mill July 28, 2012 at the site of the battle in Calwood. In March, an archeological survey made possible through an American Battlefield Protection Program and organized by the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation and Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritige will search for artifacts of the battle in the largest historical research effort of Callaway's most significant Civil War skirmish.

Missouri’s Civil War Heritage Foundation and it’s local affiliate, Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritage, have announced they will conduct an archeological survey on the core area of the Battle of Moore’s Mill.

The county’s largest and most famous skirmish during the bloody national conflict, the Battle of Moore’s Mill took place July 28, 1862 near where is now known as Calwood. A survey is scheduled to occur there March 21-24.

When Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritage co-chair Bryant Liddle became aware of the American Battlefield Protection Program of the National Park Service, an organization which issues grants for surveying and protecting U.S. battle sites, the ball to get the survey underway began rolling.

“It was my recommendation to our local Civil War Heritage that we have somebody apply for this grant, and it went to the Missouri Civil War Heritage,” said Liddle. “They ended up applying for the

Using facial reconstruction, the Navy showed last year what the two USS Monitor sailors may have looked like.

The remains of two U.S. Navy sailors, recovered in 2002 from the wreck of the service’s first ironclad warship, the USS Monitor, will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington, the Navy said Tuesday.

“These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington,” Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said in a statement. “It’s important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the significant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy.”

The Monitor sank during a storm on New Year’s Eve 1862 off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, with a loss of 16 sailors.

The wreck was discovered in 1974, but the remains that will going to Arlington were found in 2002 when a salvage team attempted to recover the ship’s gun turret.

The remains will be interred at Arlington

Mark Elson and his Civil War-era wet plate photography rig. Credit: Britain Nelms

Wet plate collodion photography … on metal and glass plates … was the way photographs were made during the Civil War. To obtain the look, feel, and authenticity for my book, I learned the process, had equipment built, and found period lenses. I fell in love with this demanding and beautiful process, with its rich tones, great detail and timeless look.” — Mark Elson on  Battlefields of Honor

Many Civil War reenactors take on the persona of their relative who fought in the war. One woman, an HR worker in real life, helps people on the battlefield as a first aid worker; another woman portrays one of the hundred or so who hid their sex and fought alongside the men. A surprising (to Americans) number of Europeans put on their own reenactments.

And when Mark Elson, a photographer by trade, reenacts, he dresses in period costume and often shoots

Statue of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest in Forrest Park, Memphis TN.

Many new findings are coming out about Forrest and his connection with the KKK, most of it goes totally against what history has taught about the man. Whether it is all true or not, it still appears that Forrest was a son of Tennessee and fought (and fought well I might add) for what he believed. I personally believe those interviewed for this piece have it wrong. They tossed in that the one gentleman was a Civil War reenactor, as to give him this much higher credibility of knowing the truth. I know reenactors who know more about the Civil War than every college professor in the country, and I know some who know about enough to fill a small pocket notebook. The point being the history needs to be looked at closer instead of making unfounded knee jerk assumptions.

Did they forget that Forrest’s grandson, also named Nathan Bedford

If you know me, you know I have hosted a few Civil War related sites over the years. All with good intentions, some lasting quite a long time, some not so long. A couple years ago I discovered HubPages and decided to move all my writing to that site to consolidate and also because I can make a little jack on the side!

But here I am starting a new Civil War site. The difference is there really isn’t a “main”focus other than the Civil War. In the past it has been to provide information about the Civil War in Missouri, about sharing info and connecting with others with an interest in the War in the West, to provide a place to post my photos and stories of my travels and to provide some education on that particular theater of the Civil War.

This time, it’s going to be a